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“My Reaction Was YIKES”

“My Reaction Was YIKES”

Jonathan Ferguson, a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries, breaks down some of the mod guns from Fallout New Vegas, including a take on the M41A Pulse Rifle, an improvised PPSh-41, and the infamous Pancor Jackhammer.

By on

In the latest video in the Firearm Expert Reacts series, Jonathan Ferguson--a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries--breaks down some of the mod guns from Fallout New Vegas and compares them to their real-life counterparts.

Firearms Expert Reacts playlist - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4T78VQoWUs&list=PLpg6WLs8kxGMgYb13XjPgOKbm5O-CDq7R

If you're interested in seeing more of Jonathan's work, you can check out more from the Royal Armouries right here. - https://www.youtube.com/user/RoyalArmouries

If you would like to support the Royal Armouries, you can make a charitable donation to the museum here. - https://royalarmouries.org/support-us/donations/

And if you would like to become a member of the Royal Armouries, you can get a membership here. - https://royalarmouries.org/support-us/membership/

You can either purchase Jonathan's book here. - https://www.headstamppublishing.com/bullpup-rifle-book

Or at the Royal Armouries shop here. - https://shop.royalarmouries.org/collections/thorneycroft-to-sa80-british-bullpup-firearms-1901-2020

You can subscribe to the Armax Journal that Jonathan Associate Edited here: https://www.armaxjournal.org/


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Firearms overtook auto accidents as the leading cause of death in children

Firearms overtook auto accidents as the leading cause of death in children

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Guns Now Leading Cause of Death for US Children

Guns Now Leading Cause of Death for US Children

April 22, 2022 -- Gun violence has become the leading killer of youth in the United States, rising by nearly 30% between 2019 and 2020.

In 2020, 4,357 children age 1-19, or about six in 100,000, died from a gun-related injury, the researchers report, slightly exceeding the number for auto accidents (3,913) and greatly exceeding deaths caused by suffocation (1,411) or drowning (966).

To observers of gun violence in this country, the grim statistical marker has been all but inevitable. Gunshots were the second leading cause of death in 2016 among children, the researchers report. But sharp rises in such fatalities since then, especially in 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic began, pushed the death toll above all other causes among Americans in this age group.

Guns accounted for more than 45,000 deaths among all age groups in 2020, also a record, according to the CDC.

Although gun deaths rose across nearly every racial and ethnic group, the increase was greatest among Black children. In this group, firearms accounted for more than 15 deaths per 100,000 children in 2020 — up from about 12 such deaths in 2019.

Homicide was the leading cause of gun deaths, followed by suicide and then accidental shootings, although the reason for some deaths could not be determined, according to the researchers.

The findings were reported April 20 in TheNew England Journal of Medicine.

Gun deaths among children are preventable, both researchers and advocates say.

“There are ways to reduce injuries without banning guns,” says Jason Goldstick, PhD, a statistician at the University of Michigan, who led the study.

Goldstick pointed to significant investments in car vehicle safety as a model for policymakers to follow today for making gun injuries less frequent and deadly.

“More people drive today than in the 1970s, and motor vehicle related injury rates are much lower,” Goldstick says.

Innovations like seatbelt laws and changes in how cars are built have made them less deadly during a crash. Similar innovations are possible in how we manage guns, he says.

More than 4.6 million U.S. children live in homes with unsecured firearms, according to Shannon Watts of the advocacy organization Moms Demand Action.

"Securely storing firearms unloaded, locked and separate from ammunition is a simple yet lifesaving action that all gun owners should follow — and lawmakers should require,” Watts said in a statement.

“The effects of gun violence ripple far beyond the child who was struck by a bullet,” says Sarah Burd-Sharps, the senior director of research for the advocacy organization Everytown for Gun Safety. Children might grieve their friends who are now lost or worry that they will be next, Burd-Sharps says.

The data in this study aren’t surprising, Burd-Sharps says, given the large number of homes in which guns are unsecured and the sharp rise in gun sales during the pandemic. On average one child per day in the United States accesses an unsecured gun that ends up injuring or killing themself or someone else, she says.

“Gun owners want to be responsible. These deaths are really preventable,” Burd-Sharps says.

In addition to securing ammunition and firearms separately, Burd-Sharps recommends wider use of biometric guns that can only be used by someone with a specific fingerprint. If a young person got ahold of such a gun, even if it was loaded, they couldn’t use it, she says.


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Pooh Shiesty Thanks His Loved Ones & Supporters After Receiving A Five Year Sentence 

Pooh Shiesty Thanks His Loved Ones & Supporters After Receiving A Five Year Sentence 

As previously reported, Pooh Shiesty was back in court earlier this week, and in the end, he was sentenced to 63 months after he plead guilty to a firearms conspiracy charge that was related to a shooting that took place in Florida.

On Thursday, an email message from Pooh was posted to his Instagram. In the message he said,

“The biggest…I just wanna thank all my love ones, supporters, and fans for holding me down during these hard times. I wish I could be coming home to ya’ll today but this could’ve been wayyyy worse, I will be back sooner than ya’ll think! But meantime new music dropping next week.”

Pooh first surrendered to authorities last June in connection to a strip club shooting that took place in Miami. He was eventually granted bond for that case, and later the alleged victim, in that case, recanted their story. However, he remained behind bars for a case that took place prior to that incident, which was a shooting that occurred in Bay Harbor Islands back in 2020.

He was later indicted for that prior case as officials used posts from his Instagram account to make their decision. He pled guilty to a single count of firearms conspiracy back in January.

However, the judge has given Pooh time served, which means he has the possibility of being released in three years with good behavior.

Pooh’s lawyer Bradford Cohen spoke with Rolling Stone following the judge’s decision and said, “Listen, nobody’s happy to go to prison, but he was happy the judge listened to our argument, and the judge received the argument well. He was satisfied with the outcome. We’re happy with the decision of the court.”

Pooh, who is signed to Gucci Mane’s record label 1017, started to gain mainstream success in 2020 when he dropped his hit record “Back in Blood,” featuring Lil Durk. He followed up with the release of his mixtape “Shiesty Season,” which is RIAA certified platinum.

Want updates directly in your text inbox? Hit us up at 917-722-8057 or click here to join!  

TSR STAFF: Jade Ashley @Jade_Ashley94


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Firearms kill more children than car crashes, new report finds

Firearms kill more children than car crashes, new report finds

Firearms kill more children than car crashes, new report finds
Firearm injury and motor vehicle collision mortality among youth aged 0–19 from 2001–2019. Data are derived from the CDC and NCHS. All Intent = all firearm deaths (homicide, suicide, and unintentional); Homicide, firearm homicide deaths; MVC, motor vehicle traffic collision; Suicide, firearm suicide deaths; Unintentional, unintentional firearm deaths. Credit: Annie Andrews, MUSC

Gun violence in the United States has increased to the point that it now kills more children than any other cause, including car accidents, and pediatricians may not be entirely prepared.

While health care providers are taught to recognize and treat many , including the opioid crisis, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the obesity crisis, violence related to firearms has not always been seen through that lens.

In an analysis of the most recent data available through the CDC, clinical researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina revealed that firearm injuries are now the leading cause of death among children under 19, and the racial gap between black and white youth is widening. The article, recently published in the journal Pediatrics, calls for physicians and other health care workers to recognize this as an epidemiological and public health challenge and to help find solutions.

Annie Andrews, M.D., a pediatrician and assistant professor of pediatrics at MUSC, led the charge to describe the most up-to-date statistics on firearm-related injuries and death to set the stage for efforts to find evidence-based solutions.

"When I became a pediatrician, I never thought that I would care for so many children who had been shot," Andrews said. "It's not something that you think about when you consider what a pediatrician does, but as a hospital-based doctor for the past 12 years I've seen it happen again and again. And I started to get really worried about this."

When Andrews and her team looked at the data, they saw that gun-related deaths in children surpassed deaths caused by motor vehicle collisions beginning in 2019. And while the death rate due to car accidents has steadily declined since 2001, the firearm death rate has continued to climb, with increased homicide and driving a 14% total increase over the last two decades.

But the team also noted a large gap in risk based on race: the overall firearm-related death rate was more than four times higher for black children than for white children, and the homicide rate was over 14 times higher for black children.

"One of the really striking things that we were able to highlight was the health inequities embedded in pediatric firearm injury," said Andrews. "We're reporting here that it became the number one cause of death for children in 2019, but for decades it's already been the leading cause of death for in this country."

The study points out that the gap has been increasing since 2013, which is a crucial finding for those working to design preventative interventions and policies.

Stored guns are safer guns

Taming a complex, systemic crisis will require a multipronged approach, according to Andrews. And two main types of programs show the most immediate promise from a health care perspective: secure gun storage counseling and hospital-based violence intervention programs. Andrews and her team also suggest that medical training should incorporate professional guidance on for all students, not just those who specialize in emergency medicine.

"We teach how to care for victims of gun violence," said Andrews. "But in my training as a pediatrician I didn't learn anything about the prevention of these injuries or even how to talk to families in a culturally sensitive way about gun ownership and secure firearm storage."

When researchers look at gun violence data, they look at three categories—unintentional injuries, homicide and suicide—and while different solutions are needed for each category, secure firearm storage can help reduce the incidence of all three.

Andrews says that encouraging parents to use secure storage—keeping guns locked and unloaded and separate from ammunition—can keep young children safe from accidental gunshots that can happen when they find a gun and pull the trigger on a loaded weapon.

Safe storage can also have a huge impact on suicide by preventing impulsive actions that teenagers may take following a tough time at school or a bad breakup. Andrews suggests that if the means are not available while the impulse is strong, these kids will have a better chance to survive.

And secure storage may reduce the incidence of school shootings by limiting easy access to guns. Seventy-six percent of school shooters under the age of 18 use a weapon from home or from the home of someone they know, so making it more difficult to obtain these weapons could have an impact.

Hospital support and grassroots local engagement

Beyond secure firearm storage, hospital-based violence intervention programs provide a means for to address community gun violence, and there are many models that have shown evidence of success. Cities and states across the country are implementing evidence-based programs that work with health care resources, law enforcement support and local communities at the neighborhood and even street block level to prevent violence, and especially to de-escalate situations to prevent repeat or retaliatory violence.

In Charleston, MUSC has partnered with numerous grassroots organizations to create a hospital-based program called Turning the Tide. Ashley Hink, M.D., is a trauma surgeon at MUSC and serves as the medical director of Turning the Tide. She described the program by emphasizing partnerships.

"With our program we can work with our pediatrics and emergency medicine colleagues to identify teenagers that are at very high risk of violence," she said. "And we can then offer interventions and support through a host of local resources."

She points to violence interruption as a critical part of the program's strategy. After receiving a call from the police or hospital that a violent event has occurred on their street or in their neighborhood, trained community members can respond on-site. They go into the neighborhood to encourage the people involved in the conflict not to retaliate or escalate the situation with more violence. Such programs have been shown to be effective but require adequate funding, which has been a challenge in some areas.

Andrews encourages all health care professionals to acknowledge that gun violence is a public health crisis. "We need to critically ask ourselves what we can do to prevent these injuries that happen every day," she said. "And once an injury has occurred, we need to figure out what we can do to prevent patients from getting harmed again in the future."

MUSC has been addressing the rise in gun violence locally by speaking with parents about secure gun storage and offering safety locks during well child checks, and this effort has been well received. The culture at the hospital has also evolved to add training on pediatric for residents and active engagement in the Turning the Tide program.

Reversing gun violence against children is a big challenge, but Andrews and Hink hope that local, state, and national changes over time will indeed turn the tide.



More information: Annie L. Andrews et al, Pediatric Firearm Injury Mortality Epidemiology, Pediatrics (2022). DOI: 10.1542/peds.2021-052739

Citation: Firearms kill more children than car crashes, new report finds (2022, April 21) retrieved 22 April 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-04-firearms-children-car.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.


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What makes a gun a gun? New ‘ghost gun’ regulation explained.

What makes a gun a gun? New ‘ghost gun’ regulation explained.

Without a background check or other regulations, and for only about $150, Americans have been able to order “ghost gun” kits that include gun parts without serial numbers that they can put together like a ballistic Lego set.

But a new rule from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) will regulate those kits like any other gun. Experts say the rule, effective in August, will close a huge loophole in existing gun laws.

Why We Wrote This

Untraceable “ghost guns” – put together like Legos from a kit – are increasingly showing up at crime scenes. Eliminating a legal loophole, a new federal rule now treats these firearm parts like regular guns.

A ghost gun is “a gun that is impossible or difficult to trace because it lacks a serial number or other identifying markings,” says Alex McCourt, an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Gun Violence Solutions.

And ghost guns are increasingly showing up in crime scenes.

The ATF will require ghost gun parts be marked and traceable just as gun manufacturers have long been required to etch serial numbers into weapons.

Organizations like Gun Owners of America have already said they will challenge the rule in court, arguing that it ends the online sale of gun parts.

But the ATF is likely within its authority to make the change, says Rafiq Ahmad, a former bureau special agent.

“It’s not government overreach,” he says. “It’s proper oversight.”

Washington

Stepping away from his lectern in the White House Rose Garden, April 11, President Joe Biden walked to a nearby display and picked up two parts of a handgun. 

“It’s not hard to put together,” he said. With a drill, at home, “it doesn’t take very long. Anyone can order it in the mail. Anyone.”

The president was holding two pieces of a “ghost gun,” a firearm manufactured without a serial number. Without a background check and for about $150, Americans can order those parts online as a kit and then put them together like a ballistic Lego set. Mr. Biden’s event at the Rose Garden was an attempt to end that. There, he announced a new rule from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) that will regulate those gun kits like any other gun. Experts say the rule, taking effect this August, will close a huge loophole in existing gun laws. 

Why We Wrote This

Untraceable “ghost guns” – put together like Legos from a kit – are increasingly showing up at crime scenes. Eliminating a legal loophole, a new federal rule now treats these firearm parts like regular guns.

What is a ghost gun?

It’s “a gun that is impossible or difficult to trace because it lacks a serial number or other identifying markings,” says Alex McCourt, an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Gun Violence Solutions. 

The ATF requires gun manufacturers to mark their weapons, like auto companies leave vehicle identification numbers on cars. These numbers are often etched onto the lower receiver – the part of the gun that holds the trigger, hammer, and slot for the magazine. 

Ghost guns are manufactured without these numbers. Most commonly, they come in the form of unmarked kits sold online with all the components of a firearm – almost always a handgun – that customers  put together at home. It just takes the included directions, basic tools, and about half an hour.  

Until now, in certain circumstances, that was legal. That’s because those kits weren’t actual firearms, in the eyes of the ATF. For decades, the bureau’s standard for what makes a gun a gun has been whether an object can be “readily” converted into a firearm. Around 2005, the agency published its criteria for that standard, and manufacturers started selling products just below the threshold, says Garen Wintemute, a violence prevention expert at the University of California, Davis.

“These guns are made entirely outside any sort of regulatory framework or oversight,” he says. “That’s the point.”  

A 9mm pistol built from parts that come in a do-it-yourself kit was displayed April 11, 2022, at the White House when President Joe Biden and Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco announced new rules that treat these firearms as regular guns that must be traceable by serial numbers.

Why are they dangerous?

Increasingly, ghost guns are showing up in crime scenes. 

Reliable data are hard to find for weapons designed not to be tracked. But in California, Professor Wintemute says, these weapons are recovered in 30% to 50% of gun-related crime scenes. The Department of Justice (DOJ) says law enforcement collected more than 20,000 “suspected ghost guns” during investigations last year. That’s 10 times more than they collected in 2016.

That increase presents two policy problems, says Professor McCourt. Law enforcement traces weapons recovered at crime scenes back to their owners through a background check database. That system is, in part, how police apprehended the lead suspect in the recent Brooklyn subway shooting in New York City. No serial numbers mean no tracing. 

Because ghost gun kits aren’t regulated like regular guns, they also don’t require background checks. That meant a massive legal loophole for children or people with mental illnesses or criminal records that bar them from gun ownership.

“If these kits are available to them, then the law loses some of its teeth,” says Professor McCourt. 

How are they now regulated?

A new “final rule” announced by the ATF and DOJ now treats gun kits as guns, requiring serial numbers and background checks. It also requires any company, such as a gunsmith or gun shop, that comes across a ghost gun, to serialize it, and for federally licensed gun dealers to keep permanent purchasing records – previously only required for 20 years. The regulations go into effect this August. 

This doesn’t spell a total end to ghost guns, says Professor Wintemute. With milling machines or 3D printers equipped with the right code, criminals and people skeptical of government regulation – the two main markets for ghost guns – can still make their own, unmarked firearms. But those machines are expensive and inaccessible to much of the public, says Professor Wintemute. 

The rule “really throws a monkey wrench into the ghost gun market,” he says. 

Organizations like Gun Owners of America have already said they will challenge the rule in court, arguing that it ends the online sale of gun parts. But the ATF is likely within its authority to make the change, says Rafiq Ahmad, a former bureau special agent. 

“It’s not government overreach,” he says. “It’s proper oversight.”


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Firearms now the top cause of death among children and adolescents, data analysis shows

Firearms now the top cause of death among children and adolescents, data analysis shows

gun violence
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Firearms have surpassed motor vehicles as the leading cause of death among children and adolescents in the United States, according to new federal data analyzed by researchers at the University of Michigan.

U-M researchers Jason Goldstick, Rebecca Cunningham and Patrick Carter co-authored an article published in The New England Journal of Medicine that quantifies the leading causes of death nationwide for individuals ages 1 to 19. Based on their analysis of data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among children and adolescents increased by 29% from 2019 to 2020.

"The increasing rates of firearm mortality are a longer-term trend and demonstrate that we continue to fail to protect our youngest population from a preventable cause of death," said Goldstick, research associate professor of emergency medicine at Michigan Medicine and of health behavior and health education at the U-M School of Public Health.

"Recent investments in firearm injury prevention research by the CDC and National Institutes of Health, in addition to community violence prevention funding in the , are a step in the right direction, but this momentum must continue if we truly want to break this alarming trend."

Goldstick and colleagues at the U-M Institute for Firearm Injury Prevention are working to maintain momentum in this space through its new Data and Methods Core, where researchers analyze national datasets to identify key trends in firearm violence. The institute launched last year as part of a $10 million university commitment to generate new knowledge and advance innovative solutions to reduce firearm injuries and deaths, while respecting the rights of law-abiding citizens to legally own firearms.

U-M researchers' latest analysis on major causes of death in children and adolescents signals an upward trend in firearm violence nationwide, and can help policymakers and community groups identify potential solutions to address this .

More than 4,300 individuals ages 1-19 across the U.S. died as the result of firearms in 2020, which includes suicides, homicides and unintentional deaths. Motor vehicles caused about 3,900 fatalities among children and adolescents in 2020, while drug poisoning deaths increased by more than 83%—to more than 1,700 total deaths—to become the third-leading cause of death in this group.

"Motor vehicle crashes were consistently the leading cause of death for children and adolescents by a fairly wide margin, but by making vehicles and their drivers safer, these types of fatalities have drastically decreased over the past 20 years," said Carter, co-director of the institute and associate professor of emergency medicine and of health behavior and .

"Injury prevention science played a crucial role in reducing automobile deaths without taking cars off the road, and we have a real opportunity here to generate a similar impact for reducing firearm deaths through the application of rigorous injury prevention science."

More than 45,000 people across the U.S. died as the result of firearms in 2020, regardless of age—a more than 13% increase when compared to 2019. The national increase was driven largely by firearm homicide, which jumped more than 33% from 2019 to 2020. Firearm suicides increased by about 1%, according to data analyzed by U-M researchers.

"Firearm violence is one of the most critical challenges facing our society, and based on the latest federal data, this crisis is growing more and more intense," said Cunningham, U-M vice president for research and the William G. Barsan Collegiate Professor of Emergency Medicine.

"As a nation, we turn to scientific evidence to prevent injuries and deaths, and firearms should be no different. Michigan has incredible expertise in this space, and we will continue to use our collective knowledge to create safer and more vibrant communities nationwide."



More information: Jason E. Goldstick et al, Current Causes of Death in Children and Adolescents in the United States, The New England Journal of Medicine (2022). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc2201761. www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc2201761

Citation: Firearms now the top cause of death among children and adolescents, data analysis shows (2022, April 20) retrieved 21 April 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-04-firearms-death-children-adolescents-analysis.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.


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Democratic Gun-Grabbers Go International

Democratic Gun-Grabbers Go International

Democratic attorneys general are teaming up with the Mexican government to target firearms.

Civilian firearm possession is illegal in Mexico. But firearms remain ubiquitous due to the steady flow of illicit goods throughout the country. In Mexico’s ongoing insurgency, escalating violence at the border has drawn the Mexican government’s attention to the source of the country’s firearms: smugglers from the United States.

Known as the “Iron River,” millions of firearms have poured into Latin America across the Rio Grande. An estimated 200,000 firearms are smuggled into Mexico annually, fulfilling the bulk of Mexico’s illegal-firearm demand.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives reported that “70 percent of firearms reported to have been recovered in Mexico from 2014 through 2018 and submitted for tracing were U.S. sourced.”

Drugs and people move north, firearms and cash move south. The business of cross-border trafficking has carried on for decades, with gangs facing varying degrees of enforcement as they rake in billions of dollars.

The Biden administration’s cruelly ambivalent attitude towards the Southwest has allowed traffickers to proceed with only token resistance from the out-of-favor Border Patrol and a loose confederation of state guards and municipal agencies. The implications of the administration’s cruelty are tough to face: The United States is not only enabling Mexico’s spiraling migrant crisis and floundering federal government, it is the single largest arms supplier to the world’s largest terrorist organizations.

For narco-terror-appeasers in Mexico City, America’s enforcement pullback provides opportunity. Unwilling or unable to secure large swaths of their border with the U.S., filing lawsuits against U.S. firearms manufacturers is a low-risk, politically convenient avenue for Mexico City to shirk blame. Luckily, they’ve found 13 Democratic attorneys general to join their crusade to remove firearms from the North American continent. The lawsuit, filed by Mexico’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs in August and joined by the Democratic attorneys general in February, seeks $10 billion in damages from ten U.S. firearms manufacturers. Hoping to challenge the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, victory in court would deal a catastrophic blow to firearms companies and open the door to similar lawsuits designed to end civilian-firearm manufacturing.

Having overcome her qualms about foreign meddling, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey declared her intent to stand with the Federales against the dastardly manufacturing workers employed at Smith & Wesson in Springfield, MA. Chicago prosecutor Kim Foxx, who has dismissed 30 percent felony cases in her jurisdiction, was also happy to join the suit. Of course, she only does so in accordance with her deep commitment to the rule of law.

Conservatives are accustomed to dead-eyed moral pronouncements about gun control from Democrats. From Robert “Beto” O’Rourke to Lori Lightfoot, the Democrats’ gun-blame routine is tried and true. But this Mexico lawsuit strikes this conservative as a new level of gun-control radicalism: Democratic attorneys general siding with Mexico against U.S. companies and workers in their own states to deal a de facto death blow to the 2nd Amendment? It’s shocking. But it ultimately passes the smell test. Andrés Manuel López Obrador is the leader of a systemically corrupt government that turns a blind eye to violence, obfuscates the causes of crime, and disregards the rule of law. So are the leaders of Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York. It was only a matter of time before the kindred spirits shed their commitments to their fellow citizens and cooperated to make shirking accountability for crime a supranational phenomena.

Corporate media, equally keen for a border-crisis narrative to distract from the Biden administration’s incompetence, have picked up on the gun-control story exciting progressive activists. The two-step strategy seems bullet-proof: First, abandon the border to narco-terrorism. Second, use the ensuing humanitarian disaster as pretext to accomplish Democratic gun-control aims. Something Biden might dub a self-licking ice cream cone.

The Biden administration is uniquely suited for the task, given the former vice president’s time in the Obama White House—the administration responsible for the ATF’s Operation Fast & Furious. If any group of political operatives and career bureaucrats know the deadly costs of illegal gun smuggling, it is the people with the hands-on experience doing it.

Cooperation with a foreign government to demolish a constitutionally protected industry is unprecedented. The modern left professes its commitment to norms but never hesitates to break them. Their willingness to do so, in tandem with lawlessness in Mexico, threatens the constitutional right of Americans to defend themselves. Though firearms manufacturers are among the first to have their civil liberties threatened by the crisis, they undoubtedly won’t be the last. Respect for sovereignty, order, and fundamental rights demand an end to this lawsuit.

about the author

Collin Pruett works for Arsenal Media Group and is a former operations associate at The American Conservative.

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What to know about ghost guns and Biden’s new rule to curb them

What to know about ghost guns and Biden’s new rule to curb them

President Biden last week announced a new rule to regulate "ghost guns," untraceable firearms that are becoming more prevalent in the U.S.

Why it matters: According to government data, 20,000 suspected ghost guns were recovered in criminal investigations in 2021, a tenfold increase in just five years.

What is a ghost gun?

Ghost guns are bought in pieces and assembled by the owner. They don't have serial numbers, so they are untraceable by law enforcement.

  • Because the individual parts themselves generally aren't legally considered firearms, anyone can buy them. That makes it easy to bypass background checks and firearm registration.
Are ghost guns legal?

It is legal for private citizens to build their own guns. Commercially produced firearms are another matter.

Background: In the wake of the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Sen. Robert Kennedy, Congress passed the Gun Control Act of 1968:

  • It required commercial firearms producers to be federally licensed.
  • Firearms had to have serial numbers.
  • Those commercially produced firearms could not be sold to certain groups, such as felons.

Yes, but: Because ghost guns aren't made by companies, they aren't subject to these regulations as long as the owner doesn't sell them.

Who makes parts for ghost guns?

There are many companies selling so-called "buy build shoot kits" online. These kits contain parts, such as frames and receivers, that are not complete enough to meet ATF definitions of firearms.

  • The buyer of the kit can complete the parts and assemble the gun themselves.

Zoom in: One of the highest-profile kit makers is Polymer80, which the Los Angeles Police Department said made up nearly 90% of the ghost guns the department recovered in 2021.

Other methods for building ghost guns are buying pieces individually or even 3D printing them.

What will the new rule do?

Under the new rule, the ATF will change its definition of a firearm to include unfinished parts like frames and receivers, which means serial numbers will be required and dealers selling the parts will need to run background checks on buyers.

  • It will take effect 120 days after it appears in the Federal Register.

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Firearms Expert Reacts To MORE Borderlands 3 Guns

Firearms Expert Reacts To MORE Borderlands 3 Guns

Jonathan Ferguson, a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries, breaks down more of the weaponry of Payday 2, including the ominous sounding Wedding Invitation, the confusing Gatlin’ Gatling Gun, and the flak-firing Flakker.

By and on

In the latest video in the Firearm Expert Reacts series, Jonathan Ferguson--a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries--breaks down more of the guns of Borderlands 3 and compares them to their potential real-life counterparts.

Firearms Expert Reacts playlist - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4T78VQoWUs&list=PLpg6WLs8kxGMgYb13XjPgOKbm5O-CDq7R

If you're interested in seeing more of Jonathan's work, you can check out more from the Royal Armouries right here. - https://www.youtube.com/user/RoyalArmouries

If you would like to support the Royal Armouries, you can make a charitable donation to the museum here. - https://royalarmouries.org/support-us/donations/

And if you would like to become a member of the Royal Armouries, you can get a membership here. - https://royalarmouries.org/support-us/membership/

You can either purchase Jonathan's book here. - https://www.headstamppublishing.com/bullpup-rifle-book

Or at the Royal Armouries shop here. - https://shop.royalarmouries.org/collections/thorneycroft-to-sa80-british-bullpup-firearms-1901-2020

You can subscribe to the Armax Journal that Jonathan Associate Edited here: https://www.armaxjournal.org/


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