Queen Elizabeth II lies in state at Westminster Hall after procession attended by thousands

Queen Elizabeth II lies in state at Westminster Hall after procession attended by thousands

King Charles follows the coffin of Queen Elizabeth, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown placed on top, is carried on a horse-drawn gun carriage of the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery.POOL/Reuters

They stood quietly, some bowed their heads, while others shed a tear. Then came waves of applause and three cheers.

The Queen left Buckingham Palace for the last time on Wednesday, her casket resting on top of a horse-drawn gun carriage. King Charles walked slowly behind along with his siblings; Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward; and his sons Prince William and Prince Harry. A gun salute from Hyde Park fired throughout the journey; one round every minute. Other senior royals including Charles’ wife, Camilla, the Queen Consort, Kate, William’s wife and now Princess of Wales, and Harry’s wife, Meghan, travelled by car.

Queen Elizabeth to lie in state

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II will be borne from Buckingham Palace through the streets of London to Westminster Hall in slow procession, where it will lie in state for four days, allowing members of the public to pay their respects

LONDON

20

KM

100

m

Admiralty Arch

Horse Guards

The Mall

10 Downing St.

Start: 2:22 p.m.

(local time)

Buckingham

Palace

End: 3:00 p.m.

Westminster Hall

GUN CARRIAGE

Coffin carried on horse-drawn gun carriage of the The King’s Royal Horse Artillery; accompanied by a military parade and members of the Royal Family

Coffin: Draped in Royal Standard, adorned with crown, orb, sceptre and wreath

LYING IN STATE

Coffin will rest on a raised platform – catafalque – in Westminster Hall, which will be open to the public from 5 p.m., Sept. 14 to 6:30 a.m., Sept. 19. Each corner of the catafalque will be guarded by soldiers from units that serve the royal household

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; GRAPHIC NEWS; REUTERS

Queen Elizabeth to lie in state

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II will be borne from Buckingham Palace through the streets of London to Westminster Hall in slow procession, where it will lie in state for four days, allowing members of the public to pay their respects

LONDON

20

KM

100

m

Admiralty Arch

Horse Guards

The Mall

10 Downing St.

Start: 2:22 p.m.

(local time)

Buckingham

Palace

End: 3:00 p.m.

Westminster Hall

GUN CARRIAGE

Coffin carried on horse-drawn gun carriage of the The King’s Royal Horse Artillery; accompanied by a military parade and members of the Royal Family

Coffin: Draped in Royal Standard, adorned with crown, orb, sceptre and wreath

LYING IN STATE

Coffin will rest on a raised platform – catafalque – in Westminster Hall, which will be open to the public from 5 p.m., Sept. 14 to 6:30 a.m., Sept. 19. Each corner of the catafalque will be guarded by soldiers from units that serve the royal household

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; GRAPHIC NEWS; REUTERS

Queen Elizabeth to lie in state

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II will be borne from Buckingham Palace through the streets of London to Westminster Hall in slow procession, where it will lie in state for four days, allowing members of the public to pay their respects

Piccadilly Circus

LONDON

Charing Cross

Detail

20

Pall Mall

KM

Embankment

Horse Guards

St. James’ Palace

Green Park

The Mall

Start: 2:22 p.m.

(local time)

Buckingham

Palace

10 Downing St.

St. James’ Park

End: 3:00 p.m.

Westminster Hall

Birdcage Walk

St. James’ Park

Victoria St.

CENTRAL LONDON

100

m

GUN CARRIAGE

Coffin carried on horse-drawn gun carriage of the The King’s Royal Horse Artillery; accompanied by a military parade and members of the Royal Family

LYING IN STATE

Coffin will rest on a raised platform – catafalque – in Westminster Hall, which will be open to the public from 5 p.m., Sept. 14 to 6:30 a.m., Sept. 19. Each corner of the catafalque will be guarded by soldiers from units that serve the royal household

Coffin: Draped in Royal Standard, adorned with crown, orb, sceptre and wreath

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; GRAPHIC NEWS; REUTERS

The procession made its way to Westminster Hall, the oldest building on the parliamentary estate, where the Queen will lie in state until her funeral on Monday. Before the public were allowed to pay their respects, senior members of the Royal Family held their own tribute and stood guard around the coffin – a tradition known as the Vigil of the Princes.

Hundreds of thousands of people lined the carriage route and some camped out overnight to get a prime spot. Others began queueing for the lying in state as early as Monday and officials estimated that more than 400,000 people would likely pass through the hall. The queue could stretch for as long as five kilometres at times and mourners have been warned that they may have to wait up to 30 hours.

Inside the home of a Queen Elizabeth superfan as she mourns the monarch

Tanya House was among the thousands who stood along the route of the procession on Wednesday, but she was stuck at the back of the crowd near Horse Guards Parade. She caught only a tiny glimpse of the coffin, but it was still worth it for her.

“I just wanted to be here where it’s all happening and you have an atmosphere. Being part of history and trying to see it,” said Ms. House who is from London and worked as nurse for decades. “I’m old enough to remember the death of George VI. I was at school when they came around and told us. I thought I’ll try and see if I can get up here at the age of 85 and see her.”

Beth Treadway tried to get as close as she could to see the coffin, but the crowd was too large and she had to give up and stand about a block from Horse Guards Parade. “It’s a little bit disappointing that we’re stuck,” said Ms. Treadway who lives outside London. She was also still glad she came. “I don’t think I would have been happy not to have come to London at this time, I needed to be part of it and say goodbye,” she said.

  • King Charles III, Princess Anne, Prince Edward, Prince William,Prince Andrew, Camilla, Queen Consort, Sir Timothy Laurence, Mr Peter Phillips, Sophie, Countess of Wessex, Catherine, Princess of Wales, Princess Beatrice and Prince Edward, Duke of Kent at Westminster Hall.Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

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Along The Mall, massive black mourning tassels hung about halfway down the length of the Union Jacks that lined the road.

Work crews stood on ladders to untangle flags and street sweepers did a final pass through before the procession arrived.

A couples metres back from the police fencing, people stood and sat on the permanent fencing, leaning on lamp posts and other people to keep their balance on the thin black rod.

“We’ve set up camp,” said Katrina Wade, as she and Karen Hartley balanced on either side of a lamp post.

“I was here just three months ago when we had the platinum jubilee, watching and cheering and that was a really joyful day, so it just seems right to come back today and say thank you,” Ms. Hartley said.

Queen Elizabeth II, the monarch of modernity, is gone

The ceremony began out of sight but as soon as the sound of guns and a marching band began, the thousands of people standing further down The Mall from Buckingham Palace went quiet.

Wearing an orange knit hat and a purple fleece, Gillian Sutton said she arrived 6 a.m. on Wednesday after taking the overnight train from Cornwall. Sitting on a blue plaid blanket, she said she didn’t want to disclose her age but she said people could guess from her white hair and the fact that she also remembers the Queen’s coronation in 1953 – which she also watched outside Buckingham Palace.

The people around her have all offered their chairs but she declined.

“Once I’ve sat on the ground, I can’t get up again,” she said. She’s not at all comfortable, “but it’s all right I shall overcome it. We British overcome everything. You’ve got to have a little bit of fun while you’re in agony.”

All of it is worth it, she said. “I just thought it was my duty to come, I wanted to come. I mean I’ve known this woman all my life and I felt I must honour her.”

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